Brazil plowed billions of dollars into building a railroad across arid backlands, only for the long-delayed project to fall prey to metal scavengers. Curvaceous new public buildings designed by the famed architect Oscar Niemeyer were abandoned right after being constructed. There was even an ill-fated U.F.O. museum built with federal funds. Its skeletal remains now sit like a lost ship among the weeds. As Brazil sprints to get ready for the World Cup in June, it has run up against a catalog of delays, some caused by deadly construction accidents at stadiums, and cost overruns. It is building bus and rail systems for spectators that will not be finished until long after the games are done. But the World Cup projects are just a part of a bigger national problem casting a pall over Brazil’s grand ambitions: an array of lavish projects conceived when economic growth was surging that now stand abandoned, stalled or wildly over budget.  Read more at the  New York Times .

Brazil plowed billions of dollars into building a railroad across arid backlands, only for the long-delayed project to fall prey to metal scavengers. Curvaceous new public buildings designed by the famed architect Oscar Niemeyer were abandoned right after being constructed. There was even an ill-fated U.F.O. museum built with federal funds. Its skeletal remains now sit like a lost ship among the weeds. As Brazil sprints to get ready for the World Cup in June, it has run up against a catalog of delays, some caused by deadly construction accidents at stadiums, and cost overruns. It is building bus and rail systems for spectators that will not be finished until long after the games are done. But the World Cup projects are just a part of a bigger national problem casting a pall over Brazil’s grand ambitions: an array of lavish projects conceived when economic growth was surging that now stand abandoned, stalled or wildly over budget.

Read more at the New York Times.

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 Brazil plowed billions of dollars into building a railroad across arid backlands, only for the long-delayed project to fall prey to metal scavengers. Curvaceous new public buildings designed by the famed architect Oscar Niemeyer were abandoned right after being constructed. There was even an ill-fated U.F.O. museum built with federal funds. Its skeletal remains now sit like a lost ship among the weeds. As Brazil sprints to get ready for the World Cup in June, it has run up against a catalog of delays, some caused by deadly construction accidents at stadiums, and cost overruns. It is building bus and rail systems for spectators that will not be finished until long after the games are done. But the World Cup projects are just a part of a bigger national problem casting a pall over Brazil’s grand ambitions: an array of lavish projects conceived when economic growth was surging that now stand abandoned, stalled or wildly over budget.  Read more at the  New York Times .
2014_02_01_DB_Brazil_Capivara-155.jpg
2014_02_01_DB_Brazil_Capivara-186.jpg
2014_02_10_DB_Brazil_0373.jpg
2014_02_01_DB_Brazil_Capivara-170.jpg
2014_02_01_DB_Brazil_Capivara-49.jpg
2014_02_17_DB_Brazil_0599.jpg
2014_02_13_DB_Brazil_0182.jpg
2014_02_12_DB_Brazil_0194.jpg
2014_02_04_DB_Brazil_0099.jpg
2014_02_11_DB_Brazil_0888.jpg
2014_02_01_DB_Brazil_Capivara-8.jpg
2014_02_17_DB_Brazil_0192.jpg
2014_02_04_DB_Brazil_0015.jpg
2014_02_17_DB_Brazil_0462.jpg
2014_02_06_DB_Brazil_0327.jpg
2014_02_13_DB_Brazil_0267.jpg
2014_02_01_DB_Brazil_Capivara-181.jpg
2014_02_04_DB_Brazil_0145.jpg
2014_02_13_DB_Brazil_0352.jpg
2014_02_01_DB_Brazil_Capivara-32.jpg

Brazil plowed billions of dollars into building a railroad across arid backlands, only for the long-delayed project to fall prey to metal scavengers. Curvaceous new public buildings designed by the famed architect Oscar Niemeyer were abandoned right after being constructed. There was even an ill-fated U.F.O. museum built with federal funds. Its skeletal remains now sit like a lost ship among the weeds. As Brazil sprints to get ready for the World Cup in June, it has run up against a catalog of delays, some caused by deadly construction accidents at stadiums, and cost overruns. It is building bus and rail systems for spectators that will not be finished until long after the games are done. But the World Cup projects are just a part of a bigger national problem casting a pall over Brazil’s grand ambitions: an array of lavish projects conceived when economic growth was surging that now stand abandoned, stalled or wildly over budget.

Read more at the New York Times.

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