In July, 2010 heavy monsoon rains in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, Sindh and Balochistan regions overwhelmed the Indus River basin, it’s rivers swelled, causing flooding of epic proportions. At one point, approximately one-fifth of Pakistan's total land area was underwater, Pakistan government authorities reported. The floods directly affected over 20 million people, mostly by destruction of property, crops, livelihood and infrastructure, with a death toll of close to 2,000. The number of people affected by the flooding exceeds the combined total of individuals affected by the 2004Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The lack of clean drinking water and sanitation sparked diseases, such as gastroenteritis, diarrhea and skin diseases. Cases of cholera were also confirmed in the Swat valley. More than two million homes were destroyed and parts of the country left uninhabitable. The after effects will be longlasting on the people of Pakistan. A full recovery is expected to take years.

In July, 2010 heavy monsoon rains in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, Sindh and Balochistan regions overwhelmed the Indus River basin, it’s rivers swelled, causing flooding of epic proportions. At one point, approximately one-fifth of Pakistan's total land area was underwater, Pakistan government authorities reported. The floods directly affected over 20 million people, mostly by destruction of property, crops, livelihood and infrastructure, with a death toll of close to 2,000. The number of people affected by the flooding exceeds the combined total of individuals affected by the 2004Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The lack of clean drinking water and sanitation sparked diseases, such as gastroenteritis, diarrhea and skin diseases. Cases of cholera were also confirmed in the Swat valley. More than two million homes were destroyed and parts of the country left uninhabitable. The after effects will be longlasting on the people of Pakistan. A full recovery is expected to take years.

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2010_09_13_Goza2_03.jpg
2010_08_29_Thatta_0006.jpg
2010_08_07_Sukkur_1019.jpg
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2010_08_02_Nowshera_0661.jpg
2010_08_27_Garhi_Khairo_0566.jpg
2010_08_25_Sultan_Colony_1559.jpg
2010_08_20_Alipur_0690.jpg
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2010_09_13_Goza2_04.jpg
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2010_09_14_Khainpur_Nathan_Shah_017.jpg
2010_08_07_Sukkur_0980.jpg
2010_08_25_Sultan_Colony_1840.jpg
2010_08_25_Sultan_Colony_1968.jpg
2010_08_11_Muzaffargah_0075.jpg
2010_08_26_Sukkur_2638.jpg
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2010_08_29_Thatta_0019.jpg
2010_08_29_Thatta_0023.jpg
2010_09_12_Faridabad_0005.jpg
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2010_08_22_Baseera_0110.jpg
2010_09_15_Sehwan_Sharif_0002.jpg
2010_08_19_Muzaffargah_0062.jpg
 In July, 2010 heavy monsoon rains in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, Sindh and Balochistan regions overwhelmed the Indus River basin, it’s rivers swelled, causing flooding of epic proportions. At one point, approximately one-fifth of Pakistan's total land area was underwater, Pakistan government authorities reported. The floods directly affected over 20 million people, mostly by destruction of property, crops, livelihood and infrastructure, with a death toll of close to 2,000. The number of people affected by the flooding exceeds the combined total of individuals affected by the 2004Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The lack of clean drinking water and sanitation sparked diseases, such as gastroenteritis, diarrhea and skin diseases. Cases of cholera were also confirmed in the Swat valley. More than two million homes were destroyed and parts of the country left uninhabitable. The after effects will be longlasting on the people of Pakistan. A full recovery is expected to take years.
2010_09_13_Goza_0223.jpg
2010_08_01_Nowshera_0162.jpg
2010_08_20_Muzaffargah_0246.jpg
2010_08_02_Nowshera_0452.jpg
2010_08_09_Muzaffargah_0286.jpg
2010_09_13_Goza2_03.jpg
2010_08_29_Thatta_0006.jpg
2010_08_07_Sukkur_1019.jpg
2010_09_12_Faridabad_0004.jpg
IMG_1907.jpg
2010_08_22_Baseera_0023.jpg
FU1C1939.jpg
2010_08_02_Nowshera_0661.jpg
2010_08_27_Garhi_Khairo_0566.jpg
2010_08_25_Sultan_Colony_1559.jpg
2010_08_20_Alipur_0690.jpg
2010_08_20_Alipur_0616.jpg
2010_09_13_Goza2_04.jpg
2010_09_13_Goza2_05.jpg
2010_09_14_Khainpur_Nathan_Shah_017.jpg
2010_08_07_Sukkur_0980.jpg
2010_08_25_Sultan_Colony_1840.jpg
2010_08_25_Sultan_Colony_1968.jpg
2010_08_11_Muzaffargah_0075.jpg
2010_08_26_Sukkur_2638.jpg
2010_08_27_Sukkur_0348.jpg
2010_08_29_Thatta_0019.jpg
2010_08_29_Thatta_0023.jpg
2010_09_12_Faridabad_0005.jpg
IMG_0337.jpg
IMG_0428.jpg
2010_08_22_Baseera_0110.jpg
2010_09_15_Sehwan_Sharif_0002.jpg
2010_08_19_Muzaffargah_0062.jpg

In July, 2010 heavy monsoon rains in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, Sindh and Balochistan regions overwhelmed the Indus River basin, it’s rivers swelled, causing flooding of epic proportions. At one point, approximately one-fifth of Pakistan's total land area was underwater, Pakistan government authorities reported. The floods directly affected over 20 million people, mostly by destruction of property, crops, livelihood and infrastructure, with a death toll of close to 2,000. The number of people affected by the flooding exceeds the combined total of individuals affected by the 2004Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2005 Kashmir earthquake and the 2010 Haiti earthquake. The lack of clean drinking water and sanitation sparked diseases, such as gastroenteritis, diarrhea and skin diseases. Cases of cholera were also confirmed in the Swat valley. More than two million homes were destroyed and parts of the country left uninhabitable. The after effects will be longlasting on the people of Pakistan. A full recovery is expected to take years.

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