RIKUZENTAKATA, JAPAN - MARCH 07: Pine trees, uprooted during last year's tsunami, lay strewn over the beach on March 07, 2012 in Rikuzentakata, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
Villagers, displaced by floods, lead their livestock through flood waters on August 22, 2010 in the village of Baseera near Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 13: Afghan National Army cadets dressed as Taliban walk back to base following a Taliban capture military exercise, overseen by French and Canadian soldiers, at the Kabul Military Training Center (KMTC) on November 13, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The ANA with approximately 195,000 soldiers is experiencing difficult times, as about a third of the Afghan army is lost each year to desertion and low re-enlistment rates, news sources report. Additional vetting has been introduced since recent attacks on Western soldiers by members of the Afghan military. Deserters offer numerous reasons for leaving before their service is over: corruption, poor food and equipment, and Taliban intimidation of their families. The Kabul Military Training Center, conducts training between 10-24 weeks to prepare recruits for service. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: An Afghan Pashtun boy, forced from the troubled province of Baglan due to threats from the Taliban, looks on as as he scavenges for recyclables at a garbage dump site on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Children working at the garbage site in Kabul said they can make up to 90 Afghans (USD $1.75) per day collecting cans and other recyclable materials for sale. If they were to stay and work in their home province, with limited options for employment, and join the Police or Army, the Taliban threatened they would come for them and their families, they said. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
An Indian woman chants slogans as she braces herself against the spray fired from Police water canons during a protest against the Indian governments reaction to recent rape incidents in India, in front of India Gate on December 23, 2012 in New Delhi, India. The gang rape of a 23-year-old paramedical student in a moving bus on December 16, in Delhi, has led to people to react openly against the governments current rape laws. Over a thousand protesters gathered in front of Delhi to protest against lax laws and the governments handling of recent rape cases all over India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 05: Afghan National Police officers from the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) walk back-to-back holding Kalishnikov rifles as they perform exercises at the QRF base on November 5, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 09: Girls work to scavenge coal at a dump site of an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 11: Afghan families walk along a dusty on November 11, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Young girls, whose families were displaced by floods, sit on a bed as they take shelter on the higher ground of a bund on August 29, 2010 in Thatta, near Hyderabad in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: Afghan National Police cadets listen during a theoretical class at the Kabul Police Academy on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 11: Hikari Oyama, 8, plays with bubbles, after she and her grandmother payed their respects at the memorial to victims of the last year's tsunami at the Okawa Elementary School, where 74 children were killed and 4 are still missing, on March 11, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. "I thought bubble suits better for children rather than incense sticks, so that is why I play with bubble here. and it always makes people laugh and relax" Oyama's grandmother said. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. On the one year anniversary, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. Across the country people are taking part in ceremonies to pay respects to the people who lost their lives. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 07: Afghan women walk through the street, as a poster of President Hamid Karzai is seen on the outside City Hall on November 7, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 24: Egyptians celebrate the election of their new president Mohamad Morsi in Tahrir Square on June 24, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Official election results today confirmed that Mohamed Morsi to be the next president of Egypt. Morsi received over 13 million or 51.7% of the votes, while his main rival, former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, received 48.27 percent. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: An Afghan Pashtun boy, forced from the troubled province of Baglan due to threats from the Taliban, looks on as he winds up for the day after scavenging for recyclables at a garbage dump site on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Children working at the garbage site in Kabul said they can make up to 90 Afghans (USD $1.75) per day collecting cans and other recyclable materials for sale. If they were to stay and work in their home province, with limited options for employment, and join the Police or Army, the Taliban threatened they would come for them and their families, they said. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - DECEMBER 18: Egyptian protestors opposing president Mohammed Morsi chant slogans during a demonstration at the Presidential Palace on December 18, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Hundreds of people gathered in front of the Presidential Palace and in Tahrir Square to protest against President Mohammed Morsi and the alleged rigging of the first round of voting in the constitutional referendum. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 12: An Afghan man sells pomegranates from a street stall in the Old City on November 12, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 11: Afghan children play on the roadside on November 11, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: Afghan National Police cadets run with Kalishnikov rifles as they train at the Kabul Police Academy on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 05: A man shelters his face from the sun as he walks past the compund of the Bank-e- Millie Afghan Bank on November 5, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 07: Afghan women walk through the street, with a poster of President Hamid Karzai seen on the outside of City Hall on November 7, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 12: Afghan children play on a road on November 12, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 11: Afghan Hazara boys accompany one of their friends before getting married, in a ritual visit to the Kart-e-Sakhi Shrine on November 11, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 12: An Afghan man sells pomegranates from a street stall in the Old City on November 12, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 05: Afghan National Police officers from the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) walk back-to-back holding Kalishnikov rifles as they perform exercises at the QRF base on November 5, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 09: Afghans and foreigners dance at a bar on November 9, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 13: Afghan National Army cadets dressed as Taliban walk back to base following a Taliban capture military exercise, overseen by French and Canadian soldiers, at the Kabul Military Training Center (KMTC) on November 13, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The ANA with approximately 195,000 soldiers is experiencing difficult times, as about a third of the Afghan army is lost each year to desertion and low re-enlistment rates, news sources report. Additional vetting has been introduced since recent attacks on Western soldiers by members of the Afghan military. Deserters offer numerous reasons for leaving before their service is over: corruption, poor food and equipment, and Taliban intimidation of their families. The Kabul Military Training Center, conducts training between 10-24 weeks to prepare recruits for service. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 19: Patients wait to be seen at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), orthopedic centre on November 19, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The ICRC rehabilitation centre works to educate and rehabilitate land-mine victims, and those with limb related deformities, back into society and employment offering micro-credit financing, home schooling and vocational training to patients. The clinic itself is unique in that all of the workers are handicapped. The ICRC centre in Kabul has registered over 57,000 patients and 114,000 countrywide in all of their centres since its inception 25 years ago. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 11: An Afghan boy sells baloons on the side of a road on November 11, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 19: Bismillah, 12, suffering from Polio Malitis is helped by his father Mastagul after having travelled from Khost province to get treatment at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) orthopaedic centre on November 19, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The ICRC rehabilitation centre works to educate and rehabilitate land-mine victims, and those with limb related deformities, back into society and employment offering micro-credit financing, home schooling and vocational training to patients. The clinic itself is unique in that all of the workers are handicapped. The ICRC centre in Kabul has registered over 57,000 patients and 114,000 countrywide in all of their centres since its inception 25 years ago. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 16: Afghan men spectate during Kowk Jangi (partridge fighting) in a park on November 16, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Kowk, is a fighting partridge, prized by their owners who lavish great care on them, and keep them in domed wicker cages. The owners fight the partridges on Friday mornings in short bouts of strength, as the birds are too valuable to allow them to be seriously harmed, with spectators gambling on the result. The final winner is declared by referees if the other Kowk keeps on retreating, when the owner admits defeat, or when the bird dies, which happens rarely. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 09: Afghan children and families take a ride at the Qargha Lake on November 9, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Qargha lake located 9km's out of Kabul, is a popular destination for swimming and boating. The Spojmai Hotel located on the banks of Lake Qargha was attacked by The Taliban in June of 2012. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: Afghan National Police cadets listen during a theoretical class at the Kabul Police Academy on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 19: ANA commando, Khairuddin Sultan, 21, is helped up by his friend Ala Mohamed who joined the army with him 18 months ago, as an orthopaedic technician moulds a cast for his prosthetic legs at the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) orthopedic centre on November 19, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Khairuddin, a double amputee, lost his legs when an IED exploded during a joint operation against the Taliban with U.S. special forces. The IED exploded while using a mine detector, sending shrapnell in to his outstretched hand and blowing up his legs. "If they want me, i would like to go back, but if they (the government) would give me a salary i would like to stay home" said the soldier. The ICRC rehabilitation centre works to educate and rehabilitate land-mine victims, and those with limb related deformities, back into society and employment offering micro-credit financing, home schooling and vocational training to patients. The clinic itself is unique in that all of the workers are handicapped. The ICRC centre in Kabul has registered over 57,000 patients and 114,000 countrywide in all of their centres since its inception 25 years ago. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 11: An Afghan boy climbs a rock fence on November 11, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 09: An Afghan couple take a ride on a paddle boat at the Qargha Lake on November 9, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Qargha lake located 9km's out of Kabul, is a popular destination for swimming and boating. The Spojmai Hotel located on the banks of Lake Qargha was attacked by The Taliban in June of 2012. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 13: Afghan National Army officer cadets participate in a Taliban capture military exercises, overseen by French and Canadian soldiers, at the Kabul Military Training Center (KMTC) on November 13, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Kabul Military Training Center, located 8 miles east of Kabul, is a local training centre for the Afghan armed forces. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 09: An An Afghan man bowls at Strikers ten pin bowling alley on November 9, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 05: Afghan National Police officers from the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) attend English language classes at the QRF base on November 5, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 09: An Afghan boy chases his friend riding a horse at the Qargha Lake on November 9, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Qargha lake located 9km's out of Kabul, is a popular destination for swimming and boating. The Spojmai Hotel located on the banks of Lake Qargha was attacked by The Taliban in June of 2012. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 13: Afghan National Army officer cadets participate in a Taliban capture military exercises, overseen by French and Canadian soldiers, at the Kabul Military Training Center (KMTC) on November 13, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Kabul Military Training Center, located 8 miles east of Kabul, is a local training centre for the Afghan armed forces. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 07: An Afghan man selling second-hand clothing lures buyers to his stall in the Old City on November 7, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 05: Afghan National Police officers from the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) charges ahead during training at the QRF base on November 5, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 15: An Afghan man displays one of his prize fighting cocks at the Ka Faroshi Bird Market in the old city on November 15, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The Ka Faroshi Bird Market is a narrow lane-way tucked away behind the Pul-e Khishti Mosque, lined with stalls selling birds by the dozen. Unique to the market and birds available is the Kowk (fighting partridge). These are prized by their owners who lavish great care on them, and keep them in domed wicker cages. The owners fight the birds on Friday mornings in short bouts of strength, as the birds are too valuable to allow them to be seriously harmed, with spectators gambling on the result. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: An Afghan Pashtun boy, forced from the troubled province of Baglan due to threats from the Taliban, looks on as as he scavenges for recyclables at a garbage dump site on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Children working at the garbage site in Kabul said they can make up to 90 Afghans (USD $1.75) per day collecting cans and other recyclable materials for sale. If they were to stay and work in their home province, with limited options for employment, and join the Police or Army, the Taliban threatened they would come for them and their families, they said. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 16: Afghan spectators watch as two fighting mastiff dogs attack each other during the weekly dog fights on November 16, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Dogfighting was banned under the Taliban for being un-Islamic but it is now common practice. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: An Afghan National Police cadet arrests a fellow cadet dressed as Taliban at the Kabul Police Academy on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Afghan's security forces are facing challenging times in terms of having the resources they need to secure Kabul and the provinces ahead of the US and NATO's plan to withdraw forces in 2014. The ANP academy's new commander is working to fast track the training centres to turn bolster it's 146,000-strong national police force long riddled with corruption, incompetence and factional rivalries. The Kabul police academy per annum graduates 500 skilled male officers, after 4 years of training, and around 30 women after 6 months of training. Of the different security strategy's, the police quick reaction force (QRF) and the "ring of steel" checkpoint strategy are designed to protect the capital from internal and external attacks from militants.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 06: Afghan children play cricket as other play soccer at Teppe Maranjanin in front of the Tomb of King Mohammad Nadir Shah on November 6, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. The tomb was built in commemoration of King Mohammad Nadir Shah who was assassinated in 1933. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 07: Afghan men pray together in a square in the Old City on November 7, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - NOVEMBER 14: An Afghan Pashtun boy, forced from the troubled province of Baglan due to threats from the Taliban, looks on as he winds up for the day after scavenging for recyclables at a garbage dump site on November 14, 2012 in Kabul, Afghanistan. Children working at the garbage site in Kabul said they can make up to 90 Afghans (USD $1.75) per day collecting cans and other recyclable materials for sale. If they were to stay and work in their home province, with limited options for employment, and join the Police or Army, the Taliban threatened they would come for them and their families, they said. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
ISTALIF, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 09: Supporters of Afghan presidential candidate and former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah depart from an election campaign rally August 9, 2009 in Istalif, north of Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 12: An Afghan woman feeds pigeons in front of the Shah-Do Shamshira Mosque ahead on August 12, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photography by Daniel Berehulak/GettyImages)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 12: A young Afghan boy looks on as others walk past posters showing candidates for it's upcoming elections on August 12, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
ISTALIF, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 09: Afghan presidential candidate and former foreign minister Abdullah Abdullah waves to supporters during an election campaign rally August 9, 2009 in Istalif, north of Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 20: Afghan police gesture at the scene of a shoot out with suspected Taliban militants, killed in a gunfight, on August 20, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. According to police, 3 militants attacked a olling station and Police were deployed, after which 2 of the militants were killed after having exchanged fire with police. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 17: Supporters of Afghan presidential candidate and former foreign minister Dr Abdullah Abdullah gather during the last day of campaigning at a rally on August 9, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
TALOQAN, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 16: Elders sit under a portrait of Abdullah Shah Mehsud as they gather to meet Afghan presidential candidate and former foreign minister Dr Abdullah Abdullah during a campaign stop in his key supporting province of Takhar, on August 16, 2009, in Taloqan, Afghanistan. (photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
TALOQAN, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 16: Afghan presidential candidate and former foreign minister Dr Abdullah Abdullah prepares himself before stepping off the helicopter to meet with supporters during a campaign stop in his heartland province of Takhar on August 16, 2009 in Taloqan, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
TALOQAN, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 16: Supporters gather to listen to Afghan presidential candidate and former foreign minister Dr Abdullah Abdullah in his heartland province of Takhar on August 9, 2009 in the village of Hoja Bahauddin near Taloqan, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 20: Afghan police drag the bodies of two Taliban militants killed in a gunfight after an attack on polling station on August 20, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -AUGUST 17 : Women sit with their children as they hold posters of Presidential hopeful Abdullah Abdullah during a rally on the last day of campaigning on August 17, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan.
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 13: Afghan president Hamid Karzai meets with supporters at an election campaign rally for women teachers on August 13, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 20: Afghan men look for their candidates before casting votes at a polling station on August 20, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 21: A Free & Fair Election Foundation of Afghan electoral workers count votes in a school on August 21, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
KABUL, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 25: Afghan workers stack ballot boxes from various provinces around Kabul at a warehouse of the Independent Election Commission (IEC) centre on August 25, 2009 in Kabul, Afghanistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
TALOQAN, AFGHANISTAN - AUGUST 16: Afghan presidential candidate and former foreign minister Dr Abdullah Abdullah looks out of a helicopter window during a visit to meet with supporters in his heartland province of Takhar on August 16, 2009 in Taloqan, Afghanistan.
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 24: Egyptians celebrate the election of their new president Mohamad Morsi in Tahrir Square on June 24, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Official election results today confirmed that Mohamed Morsi to be the next president of Egypt. Morsi received over 13 million or 51.7% of the votes, while his main rival, former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, received 48.27 percent. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 22: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 22, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - DECEMBER 14: Supporters of Egyptian President Morsi and members of the Muslim Brotherhood chant slogans during a rally on December 14, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Opponents and supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi staged final rallies in Cairo, ahead of tomorrow's referendum vote, following on from the country's draft constitution, rushed through parliament in an overnight session on November 29. The country's new draft constitution, passed by a constitutional assembly dominated by Islamists, will go to a referendum vote on December 15. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 14: Egyptian protestors gesture towards Egyptian military police through a barricade of barbed wire during a protest against presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq outside the Supreme Constitutional Court on June 14, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court ruled that the Islamist-led Parliament must be immediately dissolved, and also allowed the right of Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, to run for president. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 18: A man bound in chains chants anti-Shafiq slogans as other Egyptian supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood celebrate a premature victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi on June 18, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq contested in the second round of voting for the country's president held over two days of voting last weekend. Despite official results not having been announced, the Muslim Brotherhood are claiming victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 14: Egyptian protestors attack a taxi during a protest against presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq outside the Supreme Constitutional Court on June 14, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court ruled that the Islamist-led Parliament must be immediately dissolved, and also allowed the right of Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, to run for president. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 14: An Egyptian family look on through the window of their car as it is blocked by ptotestors during a protest against presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq outside the Supreme Constitutional Court on June 14, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court ruled that the Islamist-led Parliament must be immediately dissolved, and also allowed the right of Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, to run for president. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 18: Egyptians supporters celebrate a premature victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi on June 18, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq contested in the second round of voting for the country's president held over two days of voting last weekend. Despite official results not having been announced, the Muslim Brotherhood are claiming victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 18: Egyptians supporters celebrate a premature victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi in Tahrir Square on June 18, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq contested in the second round of voting for the country's president held over two days of voting last weekend. Despite official results not having been announced, the Muslim Brotherhood are claiming victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 19: Egyptian supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood celebrate a premature victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi in Tahrir Square on June 19, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq contested in the second round of voting for the country's president held over two days of voting last weekend. Despite official results not having been announced, the Muslim Brotherhood are claiming victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - DECEMBER 18: Egyptian protestors opposing president Mohammed Morsi chant slogans during a demonstration at the Presidential Palace on December 18, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Hundreds of people gathered in front of the Presidential Palace and in Tahrir Square to protest against President Mohammed Morsi and the alleged rigging of the first round of voting in the constitutional referendum. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 19: Egyptian riot police rest as they block the entrance to parliament building to prevent members of the recently-scrapped legistlature from entering on June 19, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq contested in the second round of voting for the country's president held over two days of voting last weekend. Despite official results not having been announced, the Muslim Brotherhood are claiming victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - DECEMBER 14: Supporters of Egyptian President Morsi and members of the Muslim Brotherhood chant slogans during a rally on December 14, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Opponents and supporters of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi staged final rallies in Cairo, ahead of tomorrow's referendum vote, following on from the country's draft constitution, rushed through parliament in an overnight session on November 29. The country's new draft constitution, passed by a constitutional assembly dominated by Islamists, will go to a referendum vote on December 15. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - DECEMBER 15: casts his vote during a referendum on the new Egyptian constitution at a polling station on December 15, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptians went to vote in the first stage of the referendum on a draft constitution, which has caused controversy and led to bitter division between liberals and Islamists. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
GIZA, EGYPT - JUNE 16: Egyptian women line-up to cast their vote, as they walk past a list with the names of local residents registered to vote, at a polling station on June 16, 2012 in Giza, Egypt. Egyptians went to the polls today after Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court on Thursday ruled that the Islamist-led Parliament must be immediately dissolved, and also upheld the right of Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, to run for president. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
GIZA, EGYPT - JUNE 16: Election officials and an Egyptian soldier direct voters during the second stage run-off presidential elections at a polling station on June 16, 2012 in Giza, Egypt. Egyptians went to the polls today after Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court on Thursday ruled that the Islamist-led Parliament must be immediately dissolved, and also upheld the right of Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, to run for president. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 14: A protestor stands atop of a poster of presidential candidate Ahmed Shafiq, covered in graffiti, during a protest against Shafiq outside the Supreme Constitutional Court on June 14, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court ruled that the Islamist-led Parliament must be immediately dissolved, and also allowed the right of Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, to run for president. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 13: Egyptian presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood speaks at a press conference on June 13, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June(Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images )
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 13: Egyptian presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood arrives to speak at a press conference on June 13, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June(Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images )
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 13: Egyptian presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood departs after speaking at a press conference on June 13, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June(Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images )
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 22: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 22, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 22: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, pray during a protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 22, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 22: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, gather for a protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 22, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 22: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, pray during a protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 22, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 21: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, take rest as they sit under anti-military gfraffiti, whilst others protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 21, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 21: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, pray during a protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 21, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
GIZA, EGYPT - JUNE 16: Egyptian women line up to cast their vote at outside of a polling station on June 16, 2012 in Giza, Egypt. Egyptians went to the polls today after Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court on Thursday ruled that the Islamist-led Parliament must be immediately dissolved, and also upheld the right of Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister, Ahmed Shafiq, to run for president. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq are pegged against each other in the second round of voting for the country's president to be held on the 16th and 17th of June. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 21: Supporters of Mohamed Morsi, the Muslim Brotherhood’s candidate, protest against Egypt’s military rulers in Tahrir Square on June 21, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian election officials have postponed the announcement of a winner in last weekend’s presidential run-off, stating they needed more time to evaluate charges of electoral abuse that could affect who becomes the country’s next president. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 19: Egyptian supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood, react to speeches at a gathering to celebrate a premature victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi in Tahrir Square on June 19, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Egyptian candidates Mohamed Morsi and Ahmed Shafiq contested in the second round of voting for the country's president held over two days of voting last weekend. Despite official results not having been announced, the Muslim Brotherhood are claiming victory for their presidential candidate Mohamed Morsi. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
CAIRO, EGYPT - JUNE 24: Egyptians celebrate the election of their new president Mohamad Morsi in Tahrir Square on June 24, 2012 in Cairo, Egypt. Official election results today confirmed that Mohamed Morsi to be the next president of Egypt. Morsi received over 13 million or 51.7% of the votes, while his main rival, former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafiq, received 48.27 percent. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 09: A woman places an extra piece of coal into her friends basket as local villagers carry coal scavenged from the dumping site of an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 11: A dog looks out as noxious fumes eminate from fissures in the ground in the village of Jina Gora on February 11, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 10: Local villagers work to scavenge coal illegally from an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 10, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 10: Local villagers relocated from Jharia by the government live in the new colony of Belgaria on February 10, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 09: A girl shields her eyes as villagers work to scavenge coal from a dump site of an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 11: Local villagers work to scavenge coal illegally from an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 11, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 11: Villagers wash themselves after a days work of scavenging coal from an open-cast mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 11, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 11: Local villagers carry coal after having scavenged the coal illegally from an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 11, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in the Easter n State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from the State owned open pit coal mines for a few dollars a day. Underground coal fires burn throughout the day and night where villagers continue to work and live, despite the governments attempt to relocate residents in fear of being swallowed up by the underground fires. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 10: Local villagers relocated from Jharia by the government, stand street-side near a food vendor in the new colony of Belgaria on February 10, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 10: People relocated from Jharia by the government, live in the new colony of Belgaria on February 10, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 09: Miners work on repairing a digger at the bottom of an open-cast coal mine in the village of Guhanwadi on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 09: Women brace themselves from winds as they wait to scavenge coal from an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 11: Local villagers carry coal after having scavenged the coal illegally from an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 11, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 09: Girls work to scavenge coal at a dump site of an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
JHARIA, INDIA - FEBRUARY 09: Women carry baskets of coal back to their village for sale, after having scavenged the coal illegally from an open-cast coal mine in the village of Jina Gora on February 09, 2012 near Jharia, India. Villagers in India’s Eastern State of Jharkhand scavenge coal illegally from open-cast coal mines to earn a few dollars a day. Claiming that decades old underground burning coal seams threatened the homes of villagers, the government has recently relocated over 2300 families to towns like Belgaria. Villagers claim they were promised schools, hospitals and free utilities for two years, which they have not received. As the world’s power needs have increased, so has the total global production of coal, nearly doubling over the last 20 years according to the World Coal Association. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
Naga sadhus bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy Ganges and Yamuna rivers during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti , the start of the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 14, 2013 in Allahabad, India. The Maha Kumbh Mela, believed to be the largest religious gathering on earth is held every 12 years on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganga, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati. The Kumbh Mela alternates between the cities of Nasik, Allahabad, Ujjain and Haridwar every three years. The Maha Kumbh Mela celebrated at the holy site of Sangam in Allahabad, is the largest and holiest, celebrated over 55 days, it is expected to attract over 100 million people. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Hindu pilgrims make their way over pontoon bridges near Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 9, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Hindu devotees bathe themselves on the banks of Sangam on January 13, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man sells peacock feathers as Hindu devotee hold out sarees to dry after having bathed on the banks of Sangam on January 13, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Hindu devotees make their way to bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 16, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Sadhus, naked Hindu holy men, walk in procession after having bathed on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, on the auspicious bathing day of Mauni Amavasya during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 10, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Hindu devotees look on as Naga Sadhus, naked Hindu holy men (unseen), walk in procession to bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, on the auspicious bathing day of Mauni Amavasya during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 10, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Naga Sadhus, naked Hindu holy men, walk in procession after having bathed on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati, on the auspicious bathing day of Mauni Amavasya during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 10, 2013 in Allahabad, India.
Hindu devotees bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy Ganges and Yamuna rivers during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti , the start of the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 14, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man begs for alms as he stands with a decorated cow on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 16, 2013 in Allahabad, India
Marching band members wait, in front of an Indian "Ambassador" vehicle, to perform during a procession walking to bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, on the auspicious bathing day of Mauni Amavasya during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 10, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
People beg for alms as Hindu devotees walk towards the banks of the holy Ganges river as people gather ahead of the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 13, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Hindu devotees bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 9, 2013 in Allahabad, India.
Hindu devotees dress themselves after having bathed on the banks of Sangam on January 13, 2013 in Allahabad, India.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Hindu devotees hang out saris to dry after having bathed on the banks of Sangam on January 15, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Naga sadhus line up along the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy Ganges and Yamuna rivers during the auspicious bathing day of Makar Sankranti , the start of the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 14, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Naga sadhus, naked Hindu holy men, participate in an initiation ceremony on the banks of the Ganges river during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 8, 2013 in Allahabad, India.
Naga sadhus, naked Hindu holy men, take a break during an initiation ceremony on the banks of the Ganges river during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 8, 2013 in Allahabad, India.
A boy sweeps rubbish from the area leading to Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 16, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Hindu pilgrims walk across a pontoon bridge as others bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 12, 2013 in Allahabad, India.
Hindu pilgrims walk across a pontoon bridge as others bathe on the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 12, 2013 in Allahabad, India.
Hindu pilgrims walk across a pontoon bridge towards the banks of Sangam, the confluence of the holy rivers Ganges, Yamuna and the mythical Saraswati, during the Maha Kumbh Mela on February 12, 2013 in Allahabad, India.
Hindu devotees walk towards the banks of the holy Ganges river as people gather ahead of the Maha Kumbh Mela on January 13, 2013 in Allahabad, India. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 06: Miura Osami, 49, a fisherman whose boat was destroyed in last year's tsunami and is now working as a volunteer in a temporary housing community centre, points to the distance indicating the height at which the tsunami struck, recalls his life on the ocean on March 06, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 02: People walk down a stretch of road in a neighbourhood ravaged by last years tsunami on March 02, 2012 in Ishinomaki, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 02: 56 year old Akira Sugawara, a security guard, walks through a yard where cars salvaged from last year's tsunami are piled, waiting for owners to come and claim them, on March 02, 2012 in Ishinomaki, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 11: (Front Row Left) Takahiro Shito, 47, father of Chisato Shito, 11, who was killed in last year's tsunami, and his fellow volunteer fire fighters, bow for a minutes silence at 2.46pm, the time the last year's eartquake struck, as they pay respects to victims of the last year's tsunami at the Okowa Elementary School, where 74 children were killed and 4 are still missing, on March 11, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. On the one year anniversary, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. Across the country people are taking part in ceremonies to pay respects to the people who lost their lives. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 02: Chairs are seen strewn in a classroom of the Kadonowaki Elementary School on March 02, 2012 in Ishinomaki, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 04: Koichi Matsumoto, 74, a local resident whose home was destroyed during last year's tsunami, holds his dog Jyonko as he walks through his temporary house on March 04, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes, living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 03: Takahiro Shito, 47, and his wife Sayomi Shito, 46, speak about their daugher, Chisato, 11, who was killed during last year's tsunami tragedy at the Okawa Elementary School on March 03, 2012, near Ishinomaki, Japan. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 03: Takahiro Shito, 47, and his wife Sayomi Shito, 46, speak about their daugher, Chisato, 11, who was killed during last year's tsunami tragedy at the Okawa Elementary School on March 03, 2012, near Ishinomaki, Japan. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
KESENNUMA, JAPAN - MARCH 07: Children walk home from school as workers sort through the rubble of a house damaged during last year's tsunami on March 07, 2012 in Kesennuma, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 04: Local residents whose homes were destroyed and are now living temporary accommodation, receive a treatment from students from a massage school volunteering through an ngo, at the community centre of a temporary housing site on March 04, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 05: Elderly Japanese people, whose homes were destroyed in last year's tsunami and now living in temporary housing, mingle at a community centre, at a temporary housing site on March 05, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 05: People, whose homes were destroyed in last year's tsunami and now living in temporary housing, leave their dwellings, at a temporary housing site on March 05, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 02: 56 year old Akira Sugawara, a security guard, walks through a yard where cars salvaged from last year's tsunami are piled, waiting for owners to come and claim them, on March 02, 2012 in Ishinomaki, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 03: A man walks across the snow at the Okowa Elementary School which was destroyed during last years tsunami on March 03, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan.Last year, when the tsunami warning was sounded, the teachers weren’t sure how best to evacuate the students. No one thought the tsunami would travel 4 km's upriver. There was snow and the mountain behind the school was very steep. Of the 108 students, 74 died and three remain missing. 10 of the school’s 13 teachers died. Some of the children who made it to the mountain wrapped their arms around trees; some were able to hang on and some were not. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 05: Children, whose homes were destroyed in last year's tsunami and now living in temporary housing, walk to catch the bus to school, at a temporary housing site on March 05, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
KESENNUMA, JAPAN - MARCH 08: Workers of the Kidoura shipyard, break for lunch as they labour to construct the first two fishing ships, 199 tonnes in size, to be built since last year's tsunami destroyed the Kodoura ship building yard on March 08, 2012 in Kesennuma, Japan. The fishing industry in North Eastern Japan's Tohoku area have suffered greatly after last year's tsunami. Numerous fishing towns had their equipment, factories, boats and livelihoods washed away. As a result large numbers of fisherman have turned to alternative industries, including labouring to clean the mountains of rubble left behind the tsunami, but most fight the uphill battle of rebuilding from scratch. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 08: Men wash themselves in a temporary bathing centre set up in a tent on March 08, 2012 in Ishinomaki, Japan. The fishing industry in North Eastern Japan's Tohoku area have suffered greatly after last year's tsunami. Numerous fishing towns had their equipment, factories, boats and livelihoods washed away. As a result large numbers of fisherman have turned to alternative industries, including labouring to clean the mountains of rubble left behind the tsunami, but most fight the uphill battle of rebuilding from scratch. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
KESENNUMA, JAPAN - MARCH 08: Eiji Yamahira 48, from Nagasaki, a ship welder eats his lunch in his temporary accomodation, as he takes a break from working in the Kidoura shipyard to construct the first two fishing ships, 199 tonnes in size, to be built since last year's tsunami destroyed ship building yards on March 08, 2012 in Kesennuma, Japan. The fishing industry in North Eastern Japan's Tohoku area have suffered greatly after last year's tsunami. Numerous fishing towns had their equipment, factories, boats and livelihoods washed away. As a result large numbers of fisherman have turned to alternative industries, including labouring to clean the mountains of rubble left behind the tsunami, but most fight the uphill battle of rebuilding from scratch. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
KESENNUMA, JAPAN - MARCH 08: Workers clean debris from destroyed houses in front of the 330 metric ton (360 ton) Kyotokumaru, which was swept by the towering tsunami from the city's dock for about 750 meters (800 yards) into a residential district, during last year's tsunami on March 08, 2012 in Kesennuma, Japan. The fishing industry in North Eastern Japan's Tohoku area have suffered greatly after last year's tsunami. Numerous fishing towns had their equipment, factories and boats and livelihoods washed away. As a result large numbers of fisherman have turned to alternative industries, including labouring to clean the mountains of rubble left behind the tsunami, but most fight the uphill battle of rebuilding from scratch. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 11: Takahiro Shito, 47, and his wife Sayomi Shito, 46, visit their daughter Chisato, 12, victim of the Okowa Elementary School tragedy, who was killed during last year's tsunami on March 11, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. On the one year anniversary, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. Across the country people are taking part in ceremonies to pay respects to the people who lost their lives. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 11: Takahiro Shito, 47, and his wife Sayomi Shito, 46, walk to pay respects to their daughter Chisato,12, buried in a nearby cemetery, victim of the Okowa Elementary School tragedy, who was killed during last year's tsunami on March 11, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. On the one year anniversary, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. Across the country people are taking part in ceremonies to pay respects to the people who lost their lives. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
NATARI, JAPAN - MARCH 06: Michiko Miura, 53, holds the hand of her son, Taisei Miura, 1 year 8 month old, as she walk past her neighbours home destroyed in last years tsunami, on March 06, 2012 in Natari, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISOMA, JAPAN - MARCH 09: Dr Hanai Tatsui, 48, prepares patient Ichiji Ishizawa, 52, to be screened for radiation during a whole body radiation check at the Minamisoma City General Hospital, just outside the 20km evacuation zone surrounding the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, on March 09, 2012 in Minamisoma in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Radiation is still being emitted from the shutdown nuclear Dai-ichi plant, though much slower than the following weeks after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami. At the Minamisoma City General Hospital, over 20,000 people are registered on waiting lists to get their radiation levels measured with a newly acquired whole-body counter. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
IITATE, JAPAN - MARCH 09: An empty street is seen in the highly radiated town, on March 09, 2012 in the village of IItate, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan. Radiation is still being emitted from the shutdown nuclear Dai-ichi plant, though much slower than the following weeks after the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami. At the Minamisoma City General Hospital, over 20,000 people are registered on waiting lists to get their radiation levels measured with a newly acquired whole-body counter. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 06: Elderly Japanese people, whose homes were destroyed in last year's tsunami and now living in temporary housing, mingle at a community centre, at a temporary housing site on March 06, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 10: School children show their emotions during the first graduation ceremony, since last years earthquake and tsunami which ravaged the town of Minamisanriku where the Shizukawa Junior High School is located on March 10, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 10: School children show their emotions during the first graduation ceremony, since last years earthquake and tsunami which ravaged the town of Minamisanriku where the Shizukawa Junior High School is located on March 10, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
MINAMISANRIKU, JAPAN - MARCH 10: Mihaya Sato, 15, from Minamisanriku smiles as she is handed flowers after the first graduation ceremony since last years earthquake and tsunami which ravaged the North East coast including the town of Minamisanriku where the Shizukawa Junior High School is located on March 10, 2012 in Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 11: Takahiro Shito, 47, takes off his cap as he wears his volunteer fire fighter uniform, as his wife Sayomi Shito, 46, and children wait to pay respects to victims of the last year's tsunami at the Okowa Elementary School, where their daughter Chisato,11was one of the 74 children, 4 are still missing, on March 11, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. On the one year anniversary, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. Across the country people are taking part in ceremonies to pay respects to the people who lost their lives. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
ISHINOMAKI, JAPAN - MARCH 11: Hikari Oyama, 8, plays with bubbles, after she and her grandmother payed their respects at the memorial to victims of the last year's tsunami at the Okawa Elementary School, where 74 children were killed and 4 are still missing, on March 11, 2012 near Ishinomaki, Japan. "I thought bubble suits better for children rather than incense sticks, so that is why I play with bubble here. and it always makes people laugh and relax" Oyama's grandmother said. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. On the one year anniversary, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. Across the country people are taking part in ceremonies to pay respects to the people who lost their lives. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
RIKUZENTAKATA, JAPAN - MARCH 07: Pine trees, uprooted during last year's tsunami, lay strewn over the beach on March 07, 2012 in Rikuzentakata, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
KESENNUMA, JAPAN - MARCH 06: The 330 metric ton (360 ton) Kyotokumaru, which was swept by the towering tsunami from the city's dock for about 750 meters (800 yards) into a residential district, during last year's tsunami sits on the ground on March 06, 2012 in Kesenumma, Japan. As the one year anniversary approaches, the areas most affected by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
NATORI, JAPAN - MARCH 11: A man watches as his paper lantern, lit in commemoration of the victims of last year's earthquake and tsunami, floats away into the distance on March 11, 2012 in Natori, Japan. Teachers at the school weren't trained for tsunami evacuation and didn't to lead the children up the snow covered mountain behind the school after the tsunami warning was sounded. Out of 108 students at the school, 74 died and four remain missing; 10 of the school’s 13 teachers were also killed. On the one year anniversary, the areas most affected by last year's March 11, 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that left 15,848 dead and 3,305 missing according to Japan's National Police Agency, continue to struggle. Thousands of people still remain without homes living in temporary dwellings. The Japanese government faces an uphill battle with the need to dispose of rubble as it works to rebuild economies and livelihoods. Across the country people are taking part in ceremonies to pay respects to the people who lost their lives. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak /Getty Images)
Flood victims scramble for food rations as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 in the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. Over six weeks after flooding began, new devastation continues across the Sindh province of Pakistan, as flood waters, still on the rise, continue to overcome new villages. The country's agricultural heartland has been devastated, with rice, corn and wheat crops destroyed by floods. Officials say as many as 22 million people have been effected during Pakistan's worst flooding in 80 years. The army and aid organisations are struggling to cope with the scope of the wide spread scale of the disaster that has killed over 1,700 people and displaced millions. The UN has described the disaster as unprecedented, with over a third of the country under water. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Flood victims scramble for food rations, dropped by a Pakistan Army soldiers, as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 on the Suprio Bund near the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A woman looks onwards as she surveys the damage to her flood affected home on August 1, 2010 in Nowshera, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A baby, held by his mother, is crushed as she and other villagers, displaced from their homes by flooding, fight for bags of flour during relief distribution on August 20, 2010 on the outskirts of Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Local residents scramble to recover water bottles dropped from a Pakistan Air force helicopter on August 2, 2010 in Nowshera, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Grandmother Miru Mai, sits alongside her new-born twin grand children, as their mother Zahida Perveen lays covered-up, after being rescued by Pakistan Army soldiers during air evacuations on August 9, 2010 over the village of Sanawan in the Muzaffargarh district in Punjab, Pakistan. Of the twin boys, un-named at the time, the first was born 15 minutes before mid-day and the other twin was born as the Army rescue helicopter was circling above to find a safe landing position on a road surrounded by flood waters. The mother was then carried on a make shift bed through chest deep flood waters to the awaiting Pakistan Army helicopter. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Flood victims scramble for food rations, dropped by Pakistan Army soldiers, as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 on the Suprio Bund near the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Young girls, whose families were displaced by floods, sit on a bed as they take shelter on the higher ground of a bund on August 29, 2010 in Thatta, near Hyderabad in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A woman washes her feet after tending to her and her husbands destroyed date crop in their flood-ravaged field on August 7, 2010 in the village of Bux Seelro near to Sukkur, Pakistan. The couple were left unable to repay a loan taken out to rent the land, debt they were expecting to pay back after having sold the crop at the end of the season. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A young flood victim peers through huddle of men packed into an overcrowded SeaKing Navy helicopter during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Villagers perform the Maghrib prayer, as they seek refuge on rooftop of a madrasa surrounded by flood waters, after Iftar, or breaking fast, in the month of Ramadan on August 21, 2010 in the village of Vasandawali south of Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Mueen Ibrahim, 10, peers around the back of his grandfather Ghulam Qadir, 52, displaced by floods, walk through flood waters on August 22, 2010 in the village of Baseera near Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan. Ghulam, walked his one water buffalo and three goats to safety to higher ground, before evacuating his family and their belongings two days before the floods hit his home in Basti Jagwala. Days after the floods hit and as his four sons tended to their belongings and livestock, Ghulam took his grandson Mueen on a journey back to see what fate had been bestowed upon his family home. Both unable to swim, and afraid of what lay ahead, they made the perilous trip back to the grandfather's village. They found the home standing and under 6 feet of water and the cotton and sugar cane crop destroyed. 'We were lucky, many others lost their homes, my neighbour drowned, but Allah protected us' said Ghulam. Both worry about the flood waters coming back. 'I am scared when I leave my house and see even small water on the side of the road and in fields' said the 11 year old Mueen.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A village surrounded by flood waters is seen from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 near the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Janzeb Khan, 55, a retired science teacher, stands in the courtyard of his home flooded with water on August 2, 2010 in Nowshera, Pakistan. Janzeb was able to evacuate himself and his family to higher ground as they watched the floods engulf their home from nearby hills. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A young girl, displaced by flooding, and stranded, on land only accessible by air, sleeps covered in flies, on a makeshift bed on August 27, 2010 in Garhi Khairo near Jacobabad in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Villagers, displaced from their homes by flooding, tussle as they queue for relief rations on August 25, 2010 in the Sultan Colony Army flood relief camp near Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A boy carries water through a flooded school yard, prior to the maghrib prayer and Iftar, or breaking fast as it is called, during the month of Ramadan on August 21, 2010 in the village of Vasandawali, south of Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Villagers displaced from their homes by flooding make their way through flood waters on August 21, 2010 in the village of Vasandawali south of Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Flood victims scramble for food rations, dropped by Pakistan Army soldiers, as they battle the downwash from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 on the Suprio Bund near the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Land washed away by flooding is seen from a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 13, 2010 in the village of Goza in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Flood victims, trapped on a roof-top, scramble for food rations dropped by a Pakistan Army helicopter during relief operations on September 14, 2010 in the flood submerged town of Khairpur Nathan Shah in Dadu district in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A boy sleeps on a make-shift bed as flood waters surround his family home on August 7, 2010 in the village of Bux Seelro near to Sukkur, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A boy and other villagers, displaced from their homes by flooding, plead for for relief rations as a soldier waves a stick in an attempt to maintain order on August 25, 2010 in the Sultan Colony Army flood relief camp near Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Villagers, displaced from their homes by flooding, hold empty containers as they queue for soup and relief rations on August 25, 2010 in the Sultan Colony Army flood relief camp near Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Villagers displaced from their homes by flooding hitch a ride on a tractor through flood waters on August 11, 2010 on the outskirts of Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A boy, displaced from his home by flooding, plays in front of his families belongings, outside of their makeshift roadside shelter, as they settle in for the evening on August 26, 2010 near Sukkur in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A girl, displaced from her home by flooding, lines up for food rations with others holding empty containers and ration cards, at a Pakistan Army flood relief camp on August 27, 2010 near Sukkur in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A boy, whose family were displaced by floods, is revived by fellow villagers after appearing to be unconscious on August 29, 2010 in Thatta, near Hyderabad in Sindh province, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Pakistani women, whose families were displaced by floods, sit on a makeshift bed, as they take shelter on the higher ground of a bund on August 29, 2010 in Thatta, near Hyderabad in Sindh province, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A Pakistan Navy soldier seats a flood victim in an attempt to control an overcrowded SeaKing Navy helicopter during evacuation operations by Pakistan Navy soldiers on September 12, 2010 in the village of Faridabad, near Khanpur in Sindh province, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man carries a refrigerator on his back, recovered from his flood destroyed home, on August 3, 2010 in Pabi near to Nowshera, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Families set in for the evening in their makeshift tent homes located on the median strip after having abandoned their flood destroyed homes, on August 3, 2010 in Pabi near to Nowshera, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Villagers, displaced by floods, lead their livestock through flood waters on August 22, 2010 in the village of Baseera near Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
12 year old Kasbano, a flood victim, holds her 3 year old nephew Athar as she prepares a meal for her brothers and sisters in a Pakistan Army run flood relief camp on September 15, 2010 on the outskirts of Sehwan Sharif in the Jamshoro District of Sindh province, Pakistan. 12 year old Kasbano has not seen her parents since flood waters entered their home 10 days ago in the village of Gozo, forcing them to flee in the middle of the night. They sought refuge on higher ground for 3 days before being evacuated by the Pakistan Navy and relocated to the flood relief camp in Sehwan Sharif. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Villagers displaced from their homes by flooding set in for the night on higher ground on August 19, 2010 on the outskirts of Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan.(Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Blank slide
A girl displaced from her home in the the Swat valley holds a boy after having chased a truck distributing ice to villagers at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on May 20, 2009 near Peshawar, Pakistan. Approximately 3 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) fled their homes as a result of an on-going military operation against the Taliban. The Pakistani forces battled militants in the Swat valley, Lower Dir and Buner regions. New camps are sprouting up while others continue to grow as people shift away from the city of Mardan where thousands were living with families and schools as the UNHCR and other aid agencies struggled to deal with the needs of so many. The displaced faced extremely harsh living conditions in the searing heat in over crowded camps. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man walks past a destroyed Pakistan Military tank, destroyed by Taliban forces during the Pakistan Army's offensive on May 15, 2009 in Dagar, in the district of Buner, Pakistan. Over a million of people are believed to be displaced as a result of these military operations against the Taliban. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Clothes dry on a tent provided by UNHCR for internally displaced people from Swat, Buner and Lower Dir, at a relief camp on May 9 2009 in Mardan, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man from Buner struggles to pull his horse into his truck, as he and his family pack their belongings, as they prepare to leave for their homes, at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on June 29, 2009 in Swabi district, Pakistan. As a reaction to the Taliban's advances in late 2008 and early 2009, in late March of 2009 the Pakistan Military launched its offensive against the Taliban in the tribal regions of Swat, Lower Dir and Buner. It is estimated that over 3 million people were displaced because of the fighting. Many Pakistani's fled their homes seeking refuge in family or friends homes, many sleeping in makeshift accommodation. Approximately over 150,000 of these Internally Displaced Person's (IPD's) were able to find refuge in relief camps run by various aid organisations and NGO's. Due to the size of the population of IDP's resources were stretched and often inadequate to cope with the increasing numbers streaming in. IDP's faced harsh living conditions for months in camps before being able to return to their homes. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Men and children, internally displaced by the Pakistan Military's operations in Swat, Buner and Lower Dir, queue with empty containers, for rations in a relief camp on May 8, 2009 in Mardan, Pakistan.
A young girl internally displaced from fighting in Swat warms up bread on a fire as others queue for tea rations at the Jalala relief camp on May 17, 2009 in Mardan, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A girl, displaced by fighting between the Pakistan Army and the Taliban, looks out from the window of a bus, as she returns to her village of Sultanwas on July 16, 2009 near Dagar in Buner, Pakistan. Thousands of IDPs have started their journey to their homes, under encouragement of the Pakistan government. The Pakistan military is playing a large role in screening returning IDPs and ensuring their safety in the areas that have now been cleared. The village of Sultanwas was the Taliban stronghold in Buner, which according to the Pakistan Military, the scene of a 3 day bloody clash between Pakistan Army and the Taliban. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
SWABI, PAKISTAN - JUNE 29: Men pray at sunset at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on June 29, 2009 in Swabi district, Pakistan. The Pakistan government has urged people Internally displaced families from Buner to return to their homes. This plan however has been stalled after a bomb exploded in the Buner district today prompting the area to be closed down, and putting into question the security of the cleared area. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - MAY 04: A man holds his son as they wait to have him immunised at the UNICEF MCH centre at the Kacha Garhi IDP camp on May 4, 2009 in Peshawar, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Men and children, internally displaced by Pakistan military operations against the Taliban in Swat, queue for rations in a relief camp on May 8, 2009 in Mardan, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A boy washes himself outside of his families temporary tent at the Jalozai IDP camp on May 09, 2009 near Peshawar, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Young girls, internally displaced from military operations in Swat queue for rations in a relief camp on May 8, 2009 in Mardan, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man, diplaced from his home in Swat rests in his tent at the Shah Mansoor IDP camp on July 1, 2009 in Swabi District, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A family internally displaced by military operations in Buner, boil water for tea outside their tent at the Chota Lahore relief camp on May 12, 2009 in Swabi, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Internally displaced men, from the Pakistan Army's offensive against the Taliban in Swat and Buner, pray in a makeshift mosque at the Chota Lahore relief camp on May 21, 2009 in Swabi, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Internally displaced persons, from the Pakistan Army's offensive against the Taliban in Swat and Buner, watch as a man is hoisted on a crane as toilets are installed at the Chota Lahore relief camp on May 21, 2009 in Swabi, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Children play in front of their home, damaged by fighting between the Pakistan Army Forces and the Taliban, after having returned to their village of Sultanwas on July 16, 2009 near Dagar in Buner, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Pakistani Police stand guard at a main crossing point in the city of Dagar on July 16, 2009 in the Buner district, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Suspected Taliban militants are held before being interrogated by the Pakistan Military at an outpost, after capturing them on a security sweep of the area, on July 16, 2009 near Dagar in Buner, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
SWABI, PAKISTAN - JULY 13: An angry mob carry a man from Swat laying on a charpai, or makeshitft bed, who according to bystanders, was beaten by Police, on asking for his food rations in a queue at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on July 13, 2009 in Swabi district, Pakistan. Approximately 3 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) have been created as a result of an on-going military operation against the Taliban. Thousands of families have been urged by the government to return to their homes in Lower Swat, Malakand and Buner. Hundreds of IDPs queued today at the Yar Hussain camp to receive their final two month food rations before leaving the camp and departing for their respective homes. The IDPs were not handed out their rations, and according to bystanders, Police in charge of distribution beat a man after he asked for his ration, sparking an angry mob which ransacked the Camp Directors Office and other rations. The army could not keep back the mob of frustrated IDPs, who carried the man from Swats' injured body on a Charpai, or makeshift bed, to present to the camp director. The Army then loaded the injured man onto a truck to take to a nearby hospital. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man from Mingora, Swat, inured by shrapnell from shelling lays in a hospital on May 16, 2009 in Peshawar, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A truck carrying residents drive past a vehicle destroyed during military operations against the Taliban on May 15, 2009 in Dagar, in the district of Buner, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Graffiti depicting army helicopters bombing vehicles is seen on a makeshift tent in the Kacha Garhi IDP camp on May 4, 2009 in Peshawar, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Pakhtoum Kumar, 13, is consoled by a neighbour, during the Pakistan military's offensive against the Taliban in his village of Mata in Swat, at a hospital on May 9, 2009 in Mardan, Northwest Pakistan. Pakhtoum lost toes on one foot and sustained injuries on the other when an artillery round hit a building across the road, on his way to school in Buner. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
SWABI, PAKISTAN - JULY 13: A girl grabs a book and turns to run, as a mob of angry IDPs ransack the District Police Officers office, after, according to bystanders, a man from Swat received injuries after being beaten by Police, on asking for his food ration in a queue at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on July 13, 2009 in Swabi district, Pakistan. Approximately 3 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) have been created as a result of an on-going military operation against the Taliban. Thousands of families have been urged by the government to return to their homes in Lower Swat, Malakand and Buner. Hundreds of IDPs queued today at the Yar Hussain camp to receive their final two month food rations before leaving the camp and departing for their respective homes. The IDPs were not handed out their rations, and according to bystanders, Police in charge of distribution beat a man after he asked for his ration, sparking an angry mob which ransacked the Camp Directors Office and other rations. The army could not keep back the mob of frustrated IDPs, who carried the man from Swats' injured body on a Charpai, or makeshift bed, to present to the camp director. The Army then loaded the injured man onto a truck to take to a nearby hospital. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
SWABI, PAKISTAN - JULY 13: A mob of angry IDPs ransack the District Police Officers office, after, according to bystanders, a man from Swat received injuries after being beaten by Police, on asking for his food ration in a queue at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on July 13, 2009 in Swabi district, Pakistan. Approximately 3 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) have been created as a result of an on-going military operation against the Taliban. Thousands of families have been urged by the government to return to their homes in Lower Swat, Malakand and Buner. Hundreds of IDPs queued today at the Yar Hussain camp to receive their final two month food rations before leaving the camp and departing for their respective homes. The IDPs were not handed out their rations, and according to bystanders, Police in charge of distribution beat a man after he asked for his ration, sparking an angry mob which ransacked the Camp Directors Office and other rations. The army could not keep back the mob of frustrated IDPs, who carried the man from Swats' injured body on a Charpai, or makeshift bed, to present to the camp director. The Army then loaded the injured man onto a truck to take to a nearby hospital. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Children, internally displaced from the Pakistan Army's offensive against the Taliban in Swat and Buner, cool of as they play in a canal at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on May 18, 2009 in Swabi, Pakistan. (Photo by DanielBerehulak/Getty Images)
PESHAWAR, PAKISTAN - MAY 04: A boy stands atop of a slide in a makeshift playgorund in the Kacha Garhi IDP camp on May 4, 2009 in Peshawar, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Families travel by road as they flee fighting between the Pakistan Military and the Taliban, from their villages in Buner, on May 6, 2009 near Swabi, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A girl internally displaced by Pakistan military operations in Lower Dir, sorts through her family's belongings on May 10, 2009 in Malakand, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
A man and a boy, internally displaced from the Pakistan Army's offensive against the Taliban in Swat and Buner, walk back to their tent after having collected water at a nearby canal at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on May 18, 2009 in Swabi, Pakistan. (Photo by DanielBerehulak/Getty Images)
A Pakistani boy internally displaced freom his home in the Swat valley swims in a canal at the Yar Hussain UNHCR camp in Chota Lahore on July 6, 2009 in Swabi district, Pakistan. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
55 year old Janzeb Khan, a science teacher stands in his courtyard that was affected by flooding nearly a year ago on July 20, 2011 in Nowshera, Pakistan. Janzeb was able to evacuate himself and his family to higher ground as they watched the floods engulf their home from nearby hills. Nearly a year later half of his home lays in rubble as he is unable to afford to rebuild. A year ago, monsoon rains caused flooding which ravaged Pakistan causing the worst natural disaster since its inception in 1947. Flood waters submerged a fifth of the countryside, equivalent to the size of England, affecting over 20 million people, displacing over 4 million and killing 2000. Millions lost their homes, farms and livelihoods. But the crisis still continues, as hundreds of thousands of people still remain homeless. Malnutrition rates in some districts on a par with some African countries. Some 800,000 families lack permanent shelter and more than a million people require food aid, according to Oxfam. Families are struggling to rebuild their homes, as the cost of bricks has doubled in most areas and quadrupled in others. For many, the impact of the disaster will continue to be felt for years to come. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
11 year old Mueen Ibrahim peers around the back of his 53 year old grandfather Ghulam Qadir as they stand for a portrait on a stretch of road that they travelled on, as they returned to survey damage to their home for the first time as flood waters receded, on July 26, 2011 in the village of Baseera near Muzaffargarh in Punjab, Pakistan. Ghulam, walked his one water buffalo and three goats to safety to higher ground, before evacuating his family and their belongings two days before the floods hit his home in Basti Jagwala. Days after the floods hit and as his four sons tended to their belongings and livestock, Ghulam took his grandson Mueen on a journey back to see what fate had been bestowed upon his family home. Both unable to swim, and afraid of what lay ahead, they made the perilous trip back to the grandfathers village. They found the home standing and under 6 feet of water and the cotton and sugar cane crop destroyed. 'We were lucky, many others lost their homes, my neighbour drowned, but Allah protected us' said Ghulam. Both worry about the flood waters coming back. 'I am scared when I leave my house and see even small water on the side of the road and in fields' said the 11 year old Mueen. (Photo by Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images)
Time Magazine - Lightbox, January 2013
Time Magazine, June 2012
Newsweek International, August 2011.
Newsweek International, August 2011.
Newsweek International, August 2011.
FT Weekend Magazine, August 2011
FT Weekend Magazine, August 2011
FT Weekend Magazine, August 2011
FT Weekend Magazine, August 2011
FT Weekend Magazine, August 2011
Time Magazine, January 2012
Time Magazine, January 2012
Time Magazine, January 2012
DerSpiegel Magazine, July 2013
Neon Magazine, December 2011
Neon Magazine, December 2011
Neon Magazine, December 2011
Neon Magazine, December 2011
Neon Magazine, December 2011
Neon Magazine, December 2011
Verve Magazine, January 2011

bio

Daniel Berehulak is an award-winning photojournalist based in New Delhi, India.

A native of Sydney, Australia, Daniel has visited over 40 countries covering history-shaping events including the Iraq war, the trial of Saddam Hussein, child labour in India, Afghanistan elections and the return of Benazir Bhutto to Pakistan, and documented people coping with the aftermath of the Japan Tsunami and the Chernobyl disaster.

His coverage of the 2010 Pakistan floods was recognized with a Pulitzer Prize nomination, one of several honours his photography has earned including three World Press Photo awards and the prestigious John Faber award from the Overseas Press Club.

Born to immigrant parents, Daniel grew up on a farm outside of Sydney. Their Ukrainian practicality did not consider photography to be a viable trade to pursue so at an early age Daniel worked on the farm and at his father's refrigeration company. After graduating from university his career as a photographer started humbly: shooting sports matches for a guy who ran his business from his garage. In 2002 he started freelancing with Getty Images in Sydney shooting mainly sport.

From 2005 to 2009, Daniel was based in London as a staff news photographer with Getty Images. He then shifted to New Delhi to advance Getty's coverage of the Indian subcontinent with a focus on the social and political instability of Pakistan and its neighbours.

As of July 2013, Daniel joined Reportage by Getty Images as a key represented photographer, to focus on a combination of long-term personal projects, breaking news and client assignments.

He is a regular contributor to The New York Times, TIME Magazine and Der Spiegel in particular, and his work appears internationally in newspapers and magazines world wide.

Daniel's awards include:

2014

Photographer of the year Freelance/Agency- Pictures Of The Year International
.

2013
General News, 3rd prize stories - World Press Photo .

2011
Finalist Breaking News Photography - The Pulitzer Prize .
The John Faber Award - Best photographic reporting from abroad in newspapers and wire services. The Overseas Press Club Of America.
1st prize stories : People in the News - World Press Photo.
3rd place: Best Published Picture Story (large markets) - The Best Of Photojournalism.
Special Jury Prize - Days Japan International Photojournalism Awards.

2010
Photograph of the year, 3 gold prizes, 1 silver and 1 award of excellence -
China International Press Photo Contest
.
1st Prize News Folio of the Year - The Press Photographer's Year Awards .
3rd Prize Nature and Environment & 3rd Prize in Spot News -
The Photographers Giving Back Award
.

2009
1st prize Live News category - The Press Photographer's Year Awards.
2nd Prize Sport Singles - The Photographers Giving Back Award .
Honorable mention - UNICEF Photo of the Year.

2008
Photo of the Year and 1st Prize News Folio of the Year -
The Press Photographer's Year Awards
.

2007
3rd prize People In the News category - World Press Photo.
Honorable Mention Serial Portrait Series - NPPA's The Best Of Photojournalism.
Foreign News Photographer of the Year - The UK's Picture Editors' Awards.

Exhibitions
2010 Crossing Paths Exhibition-Australian High Commission New Delhi, India.
World Press Photo 2007 international traveling exhibit
2006 Reportage Photojournalism Festival projection, Australia runner up for the audience award.
2005 Reportage Photojournalism Festival pojection.
2004 Getty Images Gallery London Olympic Games Exhibition.

Interviews
2011 World Press Photo.

Reportage by Getty Images

http://www.reportagebygettyimages.com

London

Patrick Di Nola (Editorial) +44 (0) 20 3227 2455 patrick.dinola@gettyimages.com
Patrick Llewellyn (Editorial) +44 (0) 20 3227 2799 patrick.llewellyn@gettyimages.com
Pamela Nolan (Commercial) +44 (0) 20 3227 2456 pamela.nolan@gettyimages.com
Aidan Sullivan +44 (0) 20 3227 2333 aidan.sullivan@gettyimages.com

New York

Lauren Steel (Editorial) +1 646-613-4161 lauren.steel@gettyimages.com
Jay Davies (Editorial) +1 646-613-3933 jay.davies@gettyimages.com
Marla Wojaczyk (Editorial)+1 646-613-3772 marla.wojaczyk@gettyimages.com
Pat Hugg (Corporate) +1 646-613-3715 pat.hugg@gettyimages.com